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Meet the Women of Tarter Krinsky & Drogin: Intellectual Property Partner and Co-Chair Amy Goldsmith

March 22, 2017

In honor of Women’s History Month, we recognize the exceptional women of Tarter Krinsky & Drogin. They bring tremendous value to our firm, our clients, our profession and our community. In this installment, learn more about Intellectual Property partner and co-chair Amy Goldsmith.

Why did you become a lawyer?
At Cornell University, I studied biology, concentration: genetics and development. My goal was to be a physician. But in my sophomore year, my sorority sisters at Kappa Delta encouraged me to run for the Cornell Campus Council. At that time, the Council (comprised of students, faculty and staff) was responsible for certain governance of the university. I ran and won and continued to serve until graduation. This experience forced me to rethink my career goals, and I worked over the next summer at the New York District Attorney’s office and Columbia Pictures. I decided to attend Cardozo since it had a strong intellectual property curriculum, given my bachelor of science degree.

What do you like most about your work?
I most enjoy the interactions with our clients. In the IP field, the clients are creative, entrepreneurial, engaging and fun. The legal issues are complex and interesting and the law is evolving every day.

Best advice ever received?
Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life.

What has been the key to your success?
I love what I do, and I’m fortunate to be like the “Energizer® bunny”. It’s fulfilling to help clients achieve their dreams using their IP as the foundation for their businesses. I listen to their concerns and my responses are geared to what makes sense from a business perspective. It’s also important to help clients connect to the resources they need outside of the legal field.

What woman most inspires you and why?
The women of the Supreme Court. Each of them followed a different path but each is a trailblazer for all women. The Supreme Court should reflect our society as a whole, and these Justices are paving the way for full equality by virtue of their presence and their decisions.

How do you see your practice changing in the next few years?
Technology has changed the practice of law in general, and more businesses are using the “do it yourself” approach. This may work for some businesses, but in my view, there will still be a need for experienced counsel to educate and guide our clients, especially in the IP field.

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